Archive for November, 2009

NOTING THE PASSING OF SJSU ART PROFESSOR EMERITUS

Posted by erin on November 14th, 2009

We Remember Geoff Bowman with Fondness and Admiration

securedownload

Geoffrey Bowman

By Theta Belcher, Assistant Gallery Director,

San Jose State School of Art and Design

Geoffrey Bowman was born with a keen intellect and a mind filled with curiosity about the world around him. As a consequence, Geoffrey led a richly varied life. During his lifetime he earned his living as a Navy sailor, insurance salesman, taxi cab driver, mail carrier, prison art teacher, SJSU professor, and as an artist. During that same lifetime Geoffrey seriously pursued and became intimately acquainted with the cooking and eating of good food, the calligraphy and spoken word of the Japanese language, growing tomatoes and eggplants, world history both ancient and modern, politics, bebop, opera, jazz, playing the tenor saxophone badly (Geoffrey felt that it was the only instrument that had a truly human musical voice), eastern philosophy, and above all his art, both printmaking and painting.

(more…)

SAM HERNANDEZ AT WILLIAM SIEGAL GALLERY

Posted by erin on November 6th, 2009

The Versatility and Lure of Wood

By Erin Goodwin-Guerrero

Sam Hernandez was born in the Bay Area and got his BA at Hayward State. In 1974 he received his MFA in sculpture from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and began to teach on the college level at East Texas State University. When he arrived in the South Bay area in the late 70s, and began teaching at Santa Clara University, he brought a buzz with him. His work was unlike anything else going on around here and he was young and already had a promising career on the burner. His sculpture was abstract and expressionistic, with energetic and free forms springing from wood. It had a conversation with the currents of sculpture in the much more established North Bay art community where artists like William Wiley and Robert Hudson were painting their works, playing in a light hearted vein, and exercising a wry humor. Hernandez’ career has been highlighted by such honors as an NEA Grant and Fulbright Fellowship and many years service as Chair of the Santa Clara University Art Department. Now a resident of Santa Cruz, and still teaching at SCU, Hernandez continues his exploration of the sculptural forms that have always driven him.

22Top_Mounter

Sam Hernandez’ Top Mounter from the 80s, evoking the figure with humor

Hernandez is prolific. He acknowledges and celebrates certain fundamentals of wood. He has executed his series in varied scale. Hernandez has played wood against metal, natural surfaces against painted and color-washed surfaces, milled work against naturally occurring forms and the figurative or organic against the geometric. The work has mostly maintained a vertical orientation that often evokes the figure. Through nearly forty years of work, he has referenced art historical styles such as African art, naive art and cubism that fold easily into the forms he hews. There has been humor, a parody of art history and a charming playfulness.

Samintercepting

Sam Hernandez’ The Way of the Intercepting Fist, 2009 at William Siegal Gallery, Santa Fe

(more…)

CARLY SILVA AT SJSU GALLERY 3

Posted by erin on November 5th, 2009

Natural Attraction
By Chris Hofer Borror

On November 3, 2009, a remarkable BFA show called “Natural Attraction” opened in Gallery 3 in the Art Department at San Jose State University. Talented sculptor Carly Silva had a minimalistic four pieces on display, all cast aluminum, that ranged in size from three feet to six and a half feet tall. Even though there were only four pieces, this was a very big show.

Carly

Carly Silva’s untitled aluminum sculpture, 2009

(more…)

MOLAS AND QUILTS AT THE MUSEUM OF QUILTS AND TEXTILES

Posted by erin on November 1st, 2009

PURE PLEASURE IN PATTERN AND TEXTURE

By Erin Goodwin-Guerrero

molablouses

The Kuna women integrate the mola into colorful blouses.

The sensual pleasures evoked by traditional crafts of the Kuna people and “a circle of women” making quilts in the historic patterns and style of Americana, are part of The World According to Joyce Gross: Quilts from the Dolph Briscoe Center and Fabric Tattoos: The Spirit of the Mola at the Museum of Quilts and textiles in San Jose. Probably engaging the one of the most fundamental of fabric arts outside of weaving itself, these rich objects of cotton cloth are marvels of the power of elemental design and patient craftsmanship. On close inspection, both reveal the most precise and exact stitches of hand sewn creations that — at least in the case of some of these quilts — appear to have been repeated into the millions on a single work. This particular collection from the Dolph Briscoe Center at the University of Texas, Austin, is a 19th and 20th C collection, and has a timeless charm. The molas, too, are the recent styles and technical achievements of artists of the 20th C.

25TigerLily-Stenge

Tiger Lily by “Chicago’s Quilting Queen”, Bertha Stenge

(more…)